Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering– B.Eng

Qualification: B.Eng (Bachelor of Engineering)

Duration: 4 years (2 years at Mahanakorn University of Technology and 2 years at The University of Sheffield)

Program description:

You’ll learn about the design and operation of processes for making a wide range of products on which everyone’s standard of living depends. These include food, fuels, medicines, plastics and the basic materials for high technology industries.

Chemical engineers are involved in developing new processes, synthesizing new products, optimising the performance of existing process systems and the management of energy in all its forms.

In Years 1 and 2 the program aims to consolidate the students’ knowledge of mathematics, chemistry and the basic principles of engineering and introduce them to the principles of chemical engineering. In year 3 the basic principles of chemical engineering are developed, particularly through laboratory classes, to emphasise practical applications.

n Year 4, students’ knowledge of chemical processes is broadened. A major feature of this year is the design project which involves working as part of a small, supervised team on the process design of a chemical plant.

Faculties

Assoc.Prof.Dr.Vissanu Meeyoo

  • Ph.D.: Chemical Engineering
  • E-mail: vissanu@mut.ac.th

Experiences

  • 1995 - present: Vice President of Research Dept. Mahanakorn University of Technology
  • 1992 - 1993: Engineer Esso(Thailand) Plc.

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D.: The University of New South Wales, Australia
  • M.Eng: (Chemical Engineering), Chulalongkorn University    

Publications

  • Somsak Thaicharoensutcharittham, Vissanu Meeyoo, Boonyarach Kitiyanan, Pramoch Rangsunvigit, Thirasak Rirksomboon, Hydrogen production by steam reforming of acetic acid over Ni-based catalysts, Catalysis Today, Volume 164, Issue 1, 2011, Pages 257-261.
  • Kroekchai Inpor, Vissanu Meeyoo, Chanchana Thanachayanont Enhancement of photovoltaic performance using hybrid CdS nanorods and MEH-PPV active layer in ITO/TiO 2/MEH-PPV:CdS/Au devices Current Apptied Physics, Volume 11, Issue 1, Supplement 2011, Pages s171-s174.
  • Asawin Bampenrat, Vissanu Meeyoo, Boonyarach Kitiyanan, Pramoch Rangsunvigit, Thirasak Rirksomboon, Naphthalene steam reforming over Mn-doped CeO2–ZrO2 supported nickel catalysts, Applied Catalysis A: General, Volume 373, Issue 1-5, 2010, Pages 154-159.
  • Somsak Thaicharoensutcharittham, Vissanu Meeyoo, Boonyarach Kitiyanan, Pramoch Rangsunvigit, Thirasak Rirksomboon, Catalytic combustion of methane over NiO/Ce 0.75Zr 0.25O 2 catalyst, Catalysis Communications, Volume 10, Issue 5, 2009, Pages 673-677.
  • Sitthiphong Pengpanich, Vissanu Meeyoo, Thirasak Rirksomboon, Johannes Schwank, iso-Octane partial oxidation over Ni-Sn/Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 catalysts, Catalysis Today, Volume 136, Issue 3-4, 2008, Pages 214-221.

Dr.Naritsara Intarajarn

  • Ph.D.: Chemical Engineering

Experiences

  • 2545 - Present  ดำรงตำแหน่ง รองคณบดี คณะวิศวกรรมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยเทคโนโลยีมหานคร และหัวหน้าภาควิชาวิศวกรรมเคมี มหาวิทยาลัยเทคโนโลยีมหานคร
  • 2555 คณะทำงานโครงการรางวัลความคิดริเริ่มทางวิทยาศาสตร์
    และเทคโนโลยีเพื่อการพัฒนาอย่างยั่งยืน STISA 6, สมาคมวิศวกรรมเคมีและเคมีประยุกต์แห่งประเทศไทย
  • 2554 คณะทำงานโครงการรางวัลความคิดริเริ่มทางวิทยาศาสตร์
  • และเทคโนโลยีเพื่อการพัฒนาอย่างยั่งยืน STISA 5, สมาคมวิศวกรรมเคมีและเคมีประยุกต์แห่งประเทศไทย
  • 2536 - 2545 อาจารย์ประจำภาควิชาวิศวกรรมเคมี  มหาวิทยาลัยเทคโนโลยีมหานคร

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D.: Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology
  • M.Eng (Chemical Engineering), Chulalongkorn University    

Publications

  • Treatment of Dilute Soluble and Colloidal  Wastewater using Anaerobic Baffled Reactor:
    Influence of Hydraulic Retention Time, Water Research, 34(4), 1307-1317, 2000
  • Colour Removal of Dye-containing Wastewater by Immobilised Laccase on TiO2
    Support, Colour Removal of Dye-containing Wastewater by Immobilised Laccase on TiO2 Support
  • ไบโอไฮโดรเจน พลังงานสะอาดจากชีวมวล, Thai Environmental Engineering
    Magazine, Vol. 6 No. 4-5 July – December 2009

Dr.Peter B.Yim

  • Ph.D.: Chemical Engineering
  • Mobile: 0860649003
  • E- mail : Petrosyim@gmail.com      

Experiences

  • 2013-Present: Lecturer,Has taught biochemistry to veterinarian and chemical engineering students, Mahanakorn University of Technology
  • 2011-Present: Consultant, Non-paid consultant  to advise a Thai engineering company and its employees, NapaTek, Bangkok
  • 2009-2011: Consultant, Technical adviser to a biotech company in applications of a patented novel instrument, ion sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET), Bio-X , Singapore
  • 2002-2008: Researcher, Coordinated and assisted industry and government technology innovation in bio- and nano technologies
  • Contributed in developing standardization of biotechnology innovation, the microarrayer
  • Discovered bacteria detection by quantum dot-bacteriophage complex using flow Cytometry, microfluidic channel, and microscopy
  • Characterized nanocrystal encapsulated liposomes for drug delivery and therapy
  • Spearhead single molecule detection and imaging projects using a custom-built  laser- scanning Confocal  microscope  for Fluorescence  Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) assay
  • Purified  and isolated  fluorescent  labeled oligonucleotides  using  PAGE and HPLC  for  studying Kinetics  and  drug  inhibitions  of  HIV-1 assay using RNA molecular beacon technology
  • Developed attachment chemistry protocols for oligonucleotides onto the glass and antibody  Labeling  onto  an  AFM  cantilever  using  polyethylene  glycol (PEG)  linker, National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA
  • 2001-2002: Research Associate, Developed  new purification and analytical methods for a  cytoskeleton protein and its assay
  • Set up a biochemistry lab and supervised students
  • Demonstrated protein and chemical interactions using the atomic force microscope
  • Perfected sub-cloning, cell culture methods, purification and isolation of proteins
  • Improved immobilization of proteins, nucleic acids, and cells on the surface, University of  Maryland,  College  Park, USA
  • 1995-2000: Research Assistant, Demonstrated  protein and  chemical interactions using the atomic  force  microscope
  • Perfected sub-cloning,cell culture methods, purification and isolation of proteins
  • Improved immobilization of proteins, nucleic acids, and cells on the surface, University of  Maryland,  College  Park, USA

EDUCATION

  •  2001: Ph.D., Biochemistry University of Maryland, College Park, College Pard, MD

  • 1994: B.Sc.,  Biochemistry University of California, Davis, Davis, CA              

ACADEMIC SERVICE

  • 2004:  NIST Grant Reviewer

LANGUAGE  SKILL

  • Fluent in English and Korean; Working Knowledge of Thai speaking, reading, and writing

Publications

  • Leonard  Pease, Jeremy Feldblyum,Silvia DePaoli Lacaerda,Rajasekhar Anumolu Peter  Yim, Matthew Clarke, HyeongGon  Kang, Jeeseong  Hwang (2010)  “Structural  Analysis of  Soft  Multicomponent Nanoparticle Clusters Using  Electrospray  Differential  Mobility  Analysis With  Transmission Electron  Microscopy,” ACSNano, 2010, 4(11), pp 6982-6988

  • Peter  B. Yim,   Matthew L. Clarkel,  Michael  McKinstry,  Silvia H.  De  Paoli  Lacerda,
    Leonard  F. Pease III,  Marina A.  Dobrovolskaia, HyeongGon  Kang,  Timothy D.
    Read,  Shanmuga  Sozhamannan,  Jeeseong Hwang (2009)  “Quantitative Characterization of Quantum  Dot labeled Lambda  Phage  for  Escherichia  Coli  Detection,” Biotechnology  and  Bioengineering 2009; 104(6): 1059-67

  • Jeffrey R. Krogmeier, HyeongGon  Kang, Matthew  L.  Clarke, Peter Yim, Jeeseong  Hwang (2007)
    “Probing  the  Dynamic  Fluorescence Properties of Single  Water-Soluble  Quantum  Dots,” J.R. Opt.
    Commun. Doi:10.1016/j.optcom.2007.07.068

  • Peter  Yim,  Marina Dobrovolskaia,  HyeongGon Kang, Matthew Clarke, Anil K. Patri, Jeeseong Hwang (2007)”Nanocrystal-based Biomimetic System for Quantitative Flow Cytometry ” Proceedings of SPIE 6430, 6430IT.

  • HyeongGon  Kang, Mathew M. Maye, Dmytro Nykypanchuk, Matthew Clarke, Peter Yim, Jeffery
    Krogmeier, Kimberly Briggman, Oleg Gang, Jeeseong Hwang (2007) “Fluorescence Intermittency and Spectral Shifts of Single Bio-conjugated Nanocrystals Studied by Single  Molecule Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy and Spectroscopy”  Proceedings of SPIE 6430,643024.

  • Jermey N.A. Matthews, Peter B.  Yim,  Donald T. Jacobs, Necois Peters, Jeffrey G. Forbes, Sandra C.
    Greer (2005) “The Polymerization of Actin: Extent of Polymerization Under Pressure, Volume Change of Polymerization, and Relaxation after Temperature Jumps, J. Chem. Phys.
    123, 074904-1 – 074904-11.

  • Peter  B. Yim, Xiaoyi  Zhang,  Eric  S. DeJong, J. Meghan  Carroll, John P. Marino, Lori S.  Goldner
    (2005) “Single  Molecule  Fluorescence  Resonance  Energy Transfer of a RNA kissing complex,”
    Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging 6, 450-460.

  • Priya  S. Niranjan, Peter  B. Yim, Jeffrey G.  Forbes, Sandra C. Greer, Jacek  Dudowicz, Karl
    Freed, Jack  F. Douglas (2003) “Polymerization of Actin: Thermodynamics near the
    Polymerization Line,” J. Chem. Phys. 119, 4070-4084

PRESENTATIONS

  • Peter  B. Yim, Michael  McKinstry, Matthew Clarke, HyeongGon Kang, Marina Dobrovolskaia,  Timothy Read, Shanmuga Sozhamannan, Jeeseong Hwang(2007) “Lambda Phage as a mobel Bacteriophage for quantum dot based sensors for quantitative binding and bacterial detection” Oral  Presentation at 17 th Evergreen International Phage Biology Meeting, USA

  • Peter  B. Yim  Matthew Clarke,HyeongGon Kang, Michael McKinstry, Shanmuga Sozhamannan,
    Jeeseong Hwang(2007) “Quantitative characterization of  nano-biomaterials using integrated
    Multi-mode optical  and  electron microscopy” Late-breaking abstract in Microscopy and
    Microanalysis Meeting 2007, USA

  • HyeongGon Kang, Matthew L.Clarke, Peter Yim, and  Jeeseong  Hwang (2007) “Properties of  DNA-and Mercaptoundecanoicacid-conjugated  Quantum  Dots  by  Single  Molecule Confocal  Microscopy and Spectroscopy” KRISS-NIST Joint  Workshop on Nano-metrology & Quality of life

  • Clarke, M. L., Kang;  H.-G., Yim, P., Kishore, R., Helmerson, K., Hwang, J. (2007) “Thermal Properties And Single Particle Tracking of Gold Nanoshells in Lipid Vesiclesand Cell Membranes,” Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies Annual Meeting, Memphis, TN

  • HyeongGon Kang, Mathew M. Maye, Dmytro Nykypanchuk, Marc Roy, Matthew L. Becker, Matthew L.Clarke, Peter Yim, Oleg Gang, and Jeeseong Hwang (2007) “Optical properties of DNA
    Conjugated quantum dots with different  DNA  lengths and different  DNA concentrations,” Joint
    NSLS and CFN Users’ Meeting, Brookhaven National  Lab, Upton, NY

  • Clarke, M. L., Kang; H.-G., Yim, P., Kishore, R., Helmerson, K., Hwang, J. (2007) “Thermal  Properties And Single Particle Tracking of  Gold Nanoshells in Lipid Vesicles,” Joint  NSLS and  CFN Users’ Meeting, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY

  • Emren Esenturk, Peter Yim, Jeeseong Hwang, Angela H. Walker(2007) “Assembly and  characterization Of nanocomplexes : Quantum dot encapsulated liposomes,”  Biophys. J. 6A Suppl. S

  • Hyeonggon  Kang, Mathew Maye, Dmytro Nykypanchuk, Matthew Clarke, Peter Yim, Kimberly
    Briggman, Oleg Gang, Jeeseong  Hwang (2007) “Optical  properties of  Single DNA-conjugated
    Quantum  Dots by Single Molecule Confocal Microscopy and Spectroscopy” with different  DNA Lengths  and different  DNA concentrations  Biophys. J. 337A-337A Suppl.S

  • Peter B. Yim (2006)  “Probing Optical Characteristics of  Bio-conjugated  Quantum Dots using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy” Asia-Pacific Workshop on Biological Physics in National  University of  Singapore.

  • Peter B.  Yim, Lori  S. Goldner, Angels M. Bardo, Eric S. DeJong, John P. Marino (2004)
    “Characterization of  fluorescence  resonance  energy  transfer between pairs of fluorophores using A RNA ruler” Biophys. J. 86, A605-606.

  • Will F. Heinz, Peter  Yim, Clemence Daeron, Lori S. Goldner(2003) “Simultaneous  force and
    Fluorescence dynamics of  single antigen-antibody pairs,” Abstracts of  papers of  the American
    Chemical Society 226: U279-U280.

  • Peter B. Yim, Donald T. Jacobs, Necois Peters, Jeffrey G. Forbes, Sandra C.Greer (2002) “The
    Polymerization of Actin: Volume Changes in H2O and D2O Buffers,” Biophys. J. 82, 1850.

  • Jeffrey G. Forbes, Peter B. Yim, Fei Wang, and  James R.  Sellers. (1999) “Characterization  of  a
    Myosin SI-Like Construct of Human Non-Muscle Myosin II-A,” Biophys. J. 76, A165.

  • Peter B. Yim, John P. Santos, and Jeffrey G. Forbes. (1998) “Unbinding Force Measurement of
    Histidine-Nickel Complex. The His-Tag Unbinding Force,” Biophys. J., 74, A186.

 





year modules (Mahanakorn University of Technology)
  1. Introduction to Computer Programming
    Fundamental programming concepts: programming paradigms, C programming and compiler; Programming style: top-down design, program design and organization concepts; Program testing and debugging; Memory representation of data; Systematic problem solving, program documentation and maintenances.
  2. English Communication Skills I
    This course incorporates all four skills in each unit, and follows on from the English learned in high-school.

    Activities are stimulating and motivating for students, and grammar is of an intermediate level.

    Speaking is an integral part of each lesson. Students’ understanding of English is widened, and their ability to use the language for communicative purposes is extended.
  3. Chemistry
    Atomic structure; quantum theory and the electron structure of atoms; chemical bonding; chemical reactions; mass relationships; intermolecular forces; the gaseous state; chemical kinetics; chemical equilibrium; acids and bases; thermochemistry; thermodynamics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; organic chemistry.
  4. Chemistry Laboratory
    Heat of reactions; rate of reactions; titration; electrochemistry; Galvanic cells; chemical equilibrium; acid-base indicators; displacement reactions; paper chromatography; semi-micro qualitative analysis.
  5. Mathematics I
    Algebra: complex numbers; vectors; linear equations; matrices; vector geometry.
    Calculus: sets; inequalities; functions; limits; properties of continuous functions; differentiable functions; the mean value theorem and applications; inverse functions; curve sketching; integration; integration techniques; applications of integration; logarithms and exponentials; hyperbolic functions.
  6. Introduction to Computer Programming
    c Fundamental programming concepts: programming paradigms, C programming and compiler; Programming style: top-down design, program design and organization concepts; Program testing and debugging; Memory representation of data; Systematic problem solving, program documentation and maintenances.
  7. Physics I
    Electrostatic; Coulomb’s law; Gauss’s laws; Biot & Savart’s law; Ampere’s law; Ohm’s law; Basic DC circuits; Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s law; Alternating current; Basic electronics; Light and modern Physics
  8. Physics Lab I
    The experimental topics are as follows; speed of light and speed of sound, h and e/m measurement, resonance, charge and capacitor, magnetic field, diffraction and interference of light, spectrum of light, light, terminal velocity, and measurement of electricity.
  9. Engineering Design
    Design composition; Evolution and history of design; different facets of design; problem solving and problem formulation; design process: concept design, detail design, analysis and manufacturing; reverse engineering; impact on environment and society; hands-on assignments to enhance the learning outcome; written and oral presentation skills.
  10. Mathematics II
    Ordinary Differential Equations.

    Linear Algebra : linear equations and matrices; vector spaces; linear transformations; Gram-Schmidt; least squares; QR factorisation; determinants; eigenvalues; eigenvectors and diagonalisation; symmetric and Hermitian matrices; Jordan forms; matrix exponentials; systems of ordinary differential equations.
  11. Engineering Materials
    Importance and application of engineering materials such as metals, plastics, polymers, semiconductor, concrete, cement, asphalt and wood etc; phase diagrams and meaning; properties testing of engineering materials and meaning; study of microstructure and macrostructure relating with property of engineering material; production processes of engineering materials and applications of such engineering materials in engineering work.
  12. Chemistry Laboratory
    Heat of reactions; rate of reactions; titration; electrochemistry; Galvanic cells; chemical equilibrium; acid-base indicators; displacement reactions; paper chromatography; semi-micro qualitative analysis.
  13. English Communication Skills II
    This course incorporates all four skills in each unit, and continues on directly from ENGL7101.

    There is more in-depth treatment of grammar, and a systematic vocabulary syllabus.

    Students’ understanding of English is again widened, and their ability to use the language for communicative purposes is extended as accuracy, fluency and correct pronunciation are incorporated.

    Report writing and oral presentation tasks are also provided.
  14. Physics II
    Electrostatic; Coulomb’s law; Gauss’s laws; Biot & Savart’s law; Ampere’s law; Ohm’s law; Basic DC circuits; Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s law; Alternating current; Basic electronics; Light and modern Physics
  15. Physics Lab II
    The experimental topics are as follows; speed of light and speed of sound, h and e/m measurement, resonance, charge and capacitor, magnetic field, diffraction and interference of light, spectrum of light, light, terminal velocity, and measurement of electricity.

year modules (Mahanakorn University of Technology)
  1. Chemistry for Chemical Engineers
    Nature of physical chemistry; gas, liquid and solid; state of matters and the properties of gases; phase equilibrium of single substances and mixtures; the topics also include chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, and fundamentals of chemical kinetics. Fundamental of analytical chemistry; applications of quantitative and qualitative analysis; gravity and titrimetry; acid-base equilibria and titrations; electro analytical methods based on electrolysis; principles and instruments of spectrophotometer and chromatography such as molecular fluorescence spectroscopy, atomic spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography.
  2. Chemistry Laboratory for Chemical Engineering I
    Laboratory investigations of analytical chemistry concepts including: quantitative and qualitative analysis, potentiometric, electrolysis, buffer, spectroscopy and separation techniques; selected topics in physical chemistry such as the properties of gases and liquids, thermochemistry, and phase diagram are also included.
  3. Chemical Engineering Principles and Calculations
    Introduction to chemical engineering principles and calculations, unit and dimesions, chemical reaction and stoichemetry; fundamental of mass and energy balances with and without chemical reactions for single and multiple systems in steady and unsteady state processes; Recycle, bypass, and purge calculations; P-V-T properties of gases and gas-vapor mixtures; Use of physical, chemical, phase equilibrium and themodynamic data for chemical industry processes.
  4. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I
    Thermodynamic relationship, Maxwell relation, and Clapeyron equation; general relations for internal energy change, enthalpy and entropy; mixture properties calculation, law of aggregation and mixing, partial molar properties, fugacity and activity concepts; phase equilibria, phase rule, and phase diagram; phase equilibrium data and analysis by Raoult’s and Henry’s laws; phase equilibrium analysis for non-ideal solution; flash calculation, chemical equilibrium, and chemical reaction; effect of temperature on equilibrium constant; chemical equilibrium for homogeneous, heterogeneous, and multi-reaction systems; an introduction of thermodynamic cycles.
  5. Mathematics I
    Several Variable Calculus: vectors and vector calculus; functions of several variables; partial derivatives; gradients; extreme values; differentials; double and triple integrals; line integrals; surface integrals.

    Complex Analysis: basic topology functions and mappings; limits; continuity and differentiability; analytic and harmonic functions; exponential, trigonometric and hyperbolic functions; principal logarithms and complex exponents; arcs, contour integrals and antiderivatives; Cauchy-Goursat theorem and Cauchy integral formula; Taylor and Laurent series; evaluating integrals; singularities and residues; real improper integrals; trigonometric integrals.
  6. Engineering Mechanics
    Force system, resultant force, equilibrium of particle and rigid body in 2 and 3 dimensions, basic structural analysis, truss, frame, machine, friction, center of gravity, moment of inertia of area and mass, virtual work, stability of structure
  7. English for International Communication I
    The aims of this course are to encourage students to analyse the systems of the English language; to expose them to a variety of challenging and interesting texts in the reading activities and to stimulate them to give their own opinions when participating in discussions. IELTS-style reading and writing tasks are also included.
  8. Biology for Chemical Engineers
    The basic of biology including cell types and function, cell chemistry, proteins; applications of the existing knowledge in biology for chemical engineers.
  9. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II
    Thermodynamic relationship, Maxwell relation, and Clapeyron equation; general relations for internal energy change, enthalpy and entropy; mixture properties calculation, law of aggregation and mixing, partial molar properties, fugacity and activity concepts; phase equilibria, phase rule, and phase diagram; phase equilibrium data and analysis by Raoult’s and Henry’s laws; phase equilibrium analysis for non-ideal solution; flash calculation, chemical equilibrium, and chemical reaction; effect of temperature on equilibrium constant; chemical equilibrium for homogeneous, heterogeneous, and multi-reaction systems; an introduction of thermodynamic cycles.
  10. Organic Chemistry for Chemical Engineers
    Study the fundamental of fermentation process, fermentation kinetics, cell and enzyme immobilisation, fermenter design, agitation and aeration, sterilisation, product recovery and purification; applications of fermentation processes and case studies.
  11. Chemistry Laboratory for Chemical Engineers II
  12. Unit Operation I
    Physical properties of fluid, dimensional analysis, fluid statics and applications of partial and fully developed turbulent flow in pipe; type of flow and friction loss, fluid transpotation, flow measurement, mixing, particle motion in fluid flow, size reduction, and particle characterisation; application of momentum transfer theory in chemical engineering units, such as; fluid flow in packed bed, fluidisation, filtration, mixing and agitation, sedimentation, and cyclone.
  13. English for International Communication II
    This course provides comprehensive coverage of the grammatical and lexical systems of English, so that students can express themselves with precision, and with a good command of idioms and collocation.
  14. General Statistics
    Probability and Statistics: probabilities and probability rules; conditional probability and Bayes’ rule; descriptive statistics; random variables; discrete random variables; mean and variance of discrete random variable; binomial, Poisson, geometric, exponential and normal distributions; sampling distributions; the central limit theorem; inferential statistics; linear regression; analysis of variance.

year modules (The University of Sheffield/Mahanakorn University of Technology)

The University of Sheffield

  1. Process Design Project
    The students work as a group to produce an outline solution to a chemical engineering problem in the form of a joint process proposal document, and a poster.

    The students work as a team to work out the details of the process. Each student produces an individual report including the design of items of process equipment, and also a topic of relevance to the project overall, such as safety, economics, energy integration, effluent treatment.

    Students make use of skills and facilities such as computer software taught earlier, and also reinforce their learning of topics taught in the same year.

    The aim is to produce professional standard documents giving sound technical solutions, with a proper appreciation of the environmental, commercial and human context.
  2. Advanced Chemical Engineering
    In the Transport Processes part of the module, humidification and drying theory with application to design are introduced.

    The unit also considers balance equations for heat and mass transfer and their solution, and examines the case of momentum transfer with a number of fluid mechanical examples introducing the Navier-Stokes equation and a number of limiting case solutions. In the Reaction Engineering part, the course extends the treatment of chemical reactors given in CPE2002.

    It covers multiple reactors, the way in which real reactors deviate from idealised ones, the concept and use of residence time distribution rather than a single residence time and consideration of chemical rate processes in multiple reactions and autocatalytic processes.

    It introduces reactions in which interaction between a fluid and a solid phase is the controlling factor. This can be a solid-fuel reation or a fuel reaction catalysed by a solid.
  3. Chemical Engineering Design
    The course covers the selection and design of process equipment found on a chemical plant, including aspects of control, scale-up methods and short cut design procedures.

    The unit also provides an introduction to process safety and loss prevention from industrial processes and will enable students, with further experience in industry, to carry out activities involved in the safety review of proposed and existing plants.

    Areas covered include hazards, incidents, hazard identification, risk assessment, fault trees, risk control methods, human factors and appropriate case studies and legislation.
  4. Crystal Science and Engineering
    The key objective of this course is to introduce students to basic crystallographic concepts and the description of the fundamental processes by which atoms, ions or molecules can be transformed into crystals and hence into products. For this purpose, the concepts such as crystallography, structural defects, phase equilibrium, solution and solubility, unsaturated, saturated and supersaturated solutions, metastable zone width, nucleation and crystal growth mechanisms, polymorphism and enatiomorphism have been considered.

    These concepts illustrate integrity and complexity of cystallisation process and how this process can be changed in a controllable manner in order to engineer particles with desired physical properties. These properties are: shape of particles, defect content, polymorphism, mechanical properties, bioavailability, impurity content, degree of crystallinity, filterability, particles with a desired state of surface properties, etc.

    Throughout the course two major attempts have been made: (a) to link the above properties with fundamental aspects of molecular self-assembly through particle formation in a comprehensive and accessible way, and (b) to emphasise significance and practical role of particle engineering in processing industries.

    The aim of the course is: to understand the basic features of Crystal Science and Engineering; to introduce the key principles of engineering of small crystalline particles; to understand the essence of phase diagrams and enable a student to use them for a rational selection of most appropriate crystallisation technique; to understand polymorphism on a molecular level and being able to recognise its importance in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries; to introduce students to the basic concepts of crystallography and related X-ray experimental techniques to characterise newly designed solid state products; to make students aware of a role of crystals in formulated products.
  5. Environmental Protection
    This unit provides an introduction to the concerns and responsibilities for the environment to engineering students.

    The environment is now an integral part of industrial operation and management with the requirements in industry enshrined in law and financial imperatives, and graduates require an understanding of their professional responsibilities and of the influence of environmental concerns on industrial function and development.

    The module includes an introduction to and history of environmental protection & sustainability, Environmental Law, Environmental Impact Assessment, environmental audits, life cycle analysis, environmental assessment and recycling and conclusions placing the environment in the global business economics.

    The module aims to provide students with a background of understanding of the interaction of industry with the environment by providing a knowledge of the interactions between industry, society and the environment, environmental legislation and issues of global and local sustainability.

    The unit also aims to provide students with the tools to understand and carry out environment management techniques and to enhance their team working and presentation skills.
  6. Process Dynamics and Control
    The broad aims are that the student should: ¿ be able to model and analyse the behaviour of typical processes and the impact of feedback upon these behaviours.

    ¿ be able to develop models of cause and effect (input-output) relationships, to produce block diagrams to represent behaviour and to be able to define Controlled Variables, Manipulated Variables, Disturbance Variables.

    ¿ understand the essential functionality of feedback control loops and the circumstances in which their potential benefits may be realised.

    ¿ have an awareness of the functionality of typical proprietary (for example DCS, SCADA and PLC) systems from the perspective of the operator. The broad aims are that the student should: ¿ be able to model and analyse the behaviour of typical processes and the impact of feedback upon these behaviours.

    ¿ be able to develop models of cause and effect (input-output) relationships, to produce block diagrams to represent behaviour and to be able to define Controlled Variables, Manipulated Variables, Disturbance Variables.

    ¿ understand the essential functionality of feedback control loops and the circumstances in which their potential benefits may be realised.

    ¿ have an awareness of the functionality of typical proprietary (for example DCS, SCADA and PLC) systems from the perspective of the operator.
  7. Project Management and HRM for Engineers
    The module is designed to introduce some of the key elements of the discipline of project management including planning and scheduling, the allocation of resources projects, risk assessment, and mechanisms for monitoring, controlling, evaluating and terminating projects.

    At the same time the module well develop an aware of the importance of human resource management for successful delivery of projects in practice, including recruitment, organisation, team working, performance measurement and appraisal of human resources as well as developing an understanding of the theories of worker motivation and leadership.

    Through a series of parallel running lectures in these two areas, the module will provide a working knowledge of how they impinge on engineering practice.

    There will be a heavy emphasis on group working, report writing and presentation as part of the assessment supplemented by online exercises and an individual portfolio.

Mahanakorn University of Technology

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year modules (The University of Sheffield/Mahanakorn University of Technology)

The University of Sheffield

  • We do not currently have any module information available for this year of the course.

Mahanakorn University of Technology

  • Coming soon